Wednesday, September 26, 2007

I've been fabric painting...













So this is gel glue. I was told that it can be used as a resist. Thank you Susan!


I tried drawing little patterns that I am used to.





































Here, on that bottom row, I held the glue bottle way up high above the fabric and let it wiggle back and forth in those fascinating lines that honey and gel glue make when gravity or air or something has its silly way with goop.




Sometimes when I sew fabric layers together and my intent is to make a rather stiff quilt, I have used this pattern ... I think that I saw it once called stippling...?


Anyway, these spirals and floweries are all one continuous line. You can imagine how helpful that might be when free machine sewing.
















And then,
Because the drawing possibilities of the glue were working out so well,
I tried writing!
Which worked.


Mostly.


The "e" here and there would fill in.



One has to use one's very best cursive writing...









And then I painted!





This fabric is one of those white on white patterns - it looks a little gravelly beneath the blue.





But oh my! It turned out quite nicely.


Check out how the words did...



Hmmm... now where shall they go?

Stay tuned.
I have a plan.

2 comments:

ANDREA said...

I like the technique! Your results are very beautiful. I have been working with wax but get tired of ironing the wax out and the tissue gets stiff too which is sometimes not wanted. Can you tell me what gel-glue is? I'd love to try! Thanks in advance
have a nice day

robinsunne said...

Gel glue is made by Elmer's - the same cow, I mean company, that makes the white glue. I got it at my local big box store.
It is a bit sloppy to write and draw with, and in the time it takes to dry, before you can start painting, I saw that it expands, or flattens out a bit - so that that "e" gets filled in, and so on.
But if perfection is something that you can set aside for a while, I am finding it to be an inexpensive and wildly fun media.
R